CHAPTER 7 - STATION REPORTING - SAR - PSHR

 

Table of contents:

 

7.1  MEMBERSHIP IN THE NTS

7.2  STATION ACTIVITY REPORT (SAR), TRAFFIC

7.2.1  CATEGORIES OF ACTIVITY - ORIG, RCVD, SENT, DLVD

7.2.2  EXPLANATIONS AND EXAMPLES

7.2.3  SAR REPORTING TECHNIQUE

7.2.3.1  EXAMPLE SAR MESSAGE

7.2.3.2  EXAMPLE SAR MESSAGE, AUTOMATED TEXT

7.3  PUBLIC SERVICE HONOR ROLL (PSHR)

7.3.1  PSHR CATEGORIES

7.3.2  PSHR REPORTING TECHNIQUE

7.3.2.1  EXAMPLE MESSAGE - SAR AND PSHR COMBINED

7.3.2.2  EXAMPLE MESSAGE - PSHR ONLY

7.3.2.3  EXAMPLE MESSAGE - SAR/PSHR, AUTOMATED TEXT

7.3.3  ARRL PSHR REFERENCE, EFFECTIVE MAY 1, 2002

 

 


7.1  MEMBERSHIP IN THE NTS

All stations are welcome to join in the ARRL National Traffic System activities.

 

* ORS Appointment:
“Individual station participation in NTS is recognized by issuance of certificates, and by appointment to the field organization’s traffic handling position, entitled Official Relay Station.” (Public Service Communications Manual; p. 26, FSD-235 2/96, ARRL, Newington, CT)

 

Forms for filing applications for appointments are available at the ARRL Web site.

 

Stations holding the ORS appointment do so with pride, being responsible for operating with the highest standards and transmissions in accordance with the best engineering practices of the Amateur Radio service. They are responsible for regularly participating in the NTS net system and reporting monthly to the Section Traffic Manager, by whom Section net certificates are issued and endorsed for net control and/or liaison duties performed. Region and Area net staffs so recognize stations participating at that level. All stations, whether appointed ORS or not, are welcome to participate in NTS traffic handling nets.

 

* SAR, Station Activity Report:
Section ARRL leadership is always interested in activity reports from stations participating in the NTS, even if only one message is handled during the reporting month. The monthly Station Activity Report is filed with the Section Traffic Manager or Section Manager.

 

* PSHR, Public Service Honor Roll Report:
In addition, monthly Public Service Honor Roll reports are welcome from all stations regardless of the earned traffic handling and public service activity point total. Those stations reporting above the established minimum threshold are included in the monthly QST Public Service Honor Roll listing.

 

There are numerous other independent nets operating throughout the country giving operators a variety of chances to participate in this public service activity. These nets usually also work in cooperation with the NTS.

 

7.2  STATION ACTIVITY REPORT (SAR), TRAFFIC

Monthly activity reports of individual stations' message traffic handling are to be sent to the Section Manager, or Section Traffic Manager as delegated, within the first days of the next month (the SM and STM both report activities to ARRL early in the following month). Traffic handling conducted on the non-amateur Military Affiliate Radio System (MARS) frequencies are not to be counted in amateur radio activity reports to the ARRL.

 

7.2.1  CATEGORIES OF ACTIVITY - ORIG, RCVD, SENT, DLVD

See ARRL Public Service Communications Manual, [Section 2, NTS Chapter 10.2], and the ARRL PSHR Reference section in this chapter.

 

Messages handled by amateur stations are counted according to the following four categories of activity:

 

* ORIGINATED:
(An off-the-air function) Any ARRL standard format message traffic prepared by you (the first party) for someone other than yourself (a third party), and filed at your amateur radio station for initial transmission over the air. Count one point. In other words, this is a radiogram which you created for another person using your station's message number and call sign.

 

Note: A message that you create for yourself does not qualify as an Origination, but will be covered later under the SENT category.

 

* RECEIVED:
(An on-the-air function) Any ARRL standard format radiogram received over amateur radio by your station. This will include message traffic received, whether for yourself, for relay to another amateur station (the second party), or received for delivery to the message addressee (a third party). Count one point.

 

Note: Messages received by other means, such as telephone, postal, E-mail, MARS, in-person, etc., are not counted as Received, however they may cause you to Originate a message for later transmission.

 

* SENT:
(An on-the-air function) Any message traffic to be sent by your station to another amateur station (a second party), whether such a message is initially transmitted from your station as your Originated message for a third party, a message for yourself, or one that was received from another amateur station. Count one point.

 

Note: Messages sent by means of telephone, postal, E-mail, etc. do not count as Sent, however they may qualify for counting as Delivered.

 

* DELIVERED:
(An off-the-air function) Any message traffic that is delivered by you to the message addressee (a third party), provided that the message was received at your station by amateur radio and that the addressee is someone other than yourself. This delivery is done by telephone, postal, E-mail, in-person, etc. Count one point.

 

Note: A message sent by amateur radio to the final addressee at another amateur station is counted as a sent message, not as a delivered message.

 

7.2.2  EXPLANATIONS AND EXAMPLES

In the identification of who are the first, second and third parties that are involved in third party message traffic handling, the radio amateur operators are always either the first or second party. Therefore message traffic may be passed between first and second parties in their own behalf, whether or not their two nations have concluded third party agreements.

 

The monthly message traffic total is the sum of the message Originated, Received, Sent, and Delivered points. Note that in some cases the same message would be counted twice; for example:

 

The same message received by amateur radio and relayed to another station by amateur radio is counted both in the Received and the Sent categories, while a message received by amateur radio and then delivered is counted both in the Received and the Delivered categories.

 

A message Originated by you for a third party and then Sent by amateur radio is counted as Originated and Sent.

 

A message Originated by you, such as a net report for you as the NCS, or a message from you to a friend, is only counted as Sent when transmitted by your amateur station.

 

A message Received by amateur radio for you at your station is counted only as Received.

 

A message received for a fellow amateur provides two choices... deliver it by phone and get a Delivered point, or deliver it on the radio and get a Sent point.

 

When transmitting or receiving messages in BOOK form, count one point for each individual message Sent and Received in the book of messages.

 

7.2.3  SAR REPORTING TECHNIQUE

At the end of each month, send a message to the SM or STM including your call sign, the month being reported, the message traffic handled in each category and the total points. This informs the section management and the ARRL about section and station activities in traffic handling.

 

The monthly SAR traffic report may be combined with the PSHR report from the same station. See the examples in the section on PSHR reporting.

 

The categories may be condensed into one mixed group as follows, providing that you carefully observe the correct order of figures, and use a zero if no credit in a category:
[ORIG] / [RCVD] / [SENT] / [DLVD]

 

7.2.3.1  EXAMPLE SAR MESSAGE

Traffic report SAR only.

NR 6 W3XYZ 7 SPARKS MD SEP 1

 

 

Section Traffic Manager (STM)

 

address (Locally usually only the STM’s call sign is required.) =

 

AUGUST TRAFFIC  3/5/6/2  TOTAL  16

 

X  73

 

= W3XYZ

 

Where the mixed group reads Originated 3, Received 5, Sent 6, Delivered 2. Zeros in any category should be preserved to maintain clear the meaning of the 4 entries in the mixed group, as in 0/5/6/0. The use of 73 is optional.

 

This is an example only. Internal Section Activity Reports may well be tailored by the Section leadership.

 

7.2.3.2  EXAMPLE SAR MESSAGE, AUTOMATED TEXT

Text formatted (single spaced) for automated text data processing option (MDC Section):

NR 6 W3XYZ 6 SPARKS MD SEP 1

 

Section Traffic Manager (STM)

 

address (Locally usually only the STM’s call sign is required.) =

 

W3XYZ 0208 SAR 3/5/6/2/16 X

 

73

 

= W3XYZ

 

The “0208” groups are Year/Month (YYMM), August 2002 in this example. The mixed group categories are as in the previous example with the total added at the end. This is an example only. Internal Section Activity Reports may well be tailored by the Section leadership.

 

7.3  PUBLIC SERVICE HONOR ROLL (PSHR)

Amateur operators are encouraged to report their public service activities to their Section Manager, or as they may delegate to either the STM or the Section Emergency Coordinator (SEC), in the following categories: (It's optional to report, if your point total is below current minimum. SMs appreciate hearing about your activity.)

 

See the following sections for reporting technique, PSHR criteria, and the full explanation from ARRL.

 

7.3.1  PSHR CATEGORIES

This listing is to recognize radio amateurs whose public service performance during the month indicted qualifies for 70 or more total points in the following 6 categories (as reported to their Section Managers). Please note the maximum points for each category:

 

1.) Participating in a public service net, using any mode. --1 point per net session; maximum 40.

 

2.) Handling formal messages (radiograms) via any mode. --1 point for each message handled; maximum 40.

 

3.) Serving in an ARRL-sponsored volunteer position: ARRL Field Organization appointee or Section Manager, NTS Net Manager, TCC Director, TCC member, NTS official or appointee above the Section level. -- 10 points for each position; maximum 30.

 

4.) Participation in scheduled, short-term public service events such as walk-a-thons, bike-a-thons, parades, simulated emergency tests and related practice events. This includes off-the-air meetings and coordination efforts with related emergency groups and served agencies.-- 5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent in either coordinating and/or operating in the public service event; no limit.

 

5.) Participation in an unplanned emergency response when the Amateur Radio operator is on the scene. This also includes unplanned incident requests by public or served agencies for Amateur Radio participation. -- 5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent directly involved in the emergency operation; no limit.

 

6.) Providing and maintaining a) an automated digital system that handles ARRL radiogram-formatted messages; b) a Web page e-mail list server oriented toward Amateur Radio public service -- 10 points per item.

 

Amateur Radio stations that qualify for PSHR 12 consecutive months, or 18 out of a 24 month period, will be awarded a certificate from Headquarters upon written notification of qualifying months to the Public Service Branch of Field and Educational Services at ARRL HQ.

 

7.3.2  PSHR REPORTING TECHNIQUE

PSHR categories may be listed as mixed groups for each category as follows:

 

1/#

2/#

3/#

4/#

5/#

6/#

TOTAL #

Where the # is the points in each category 1 through 6, and total points.

 

Categories for which no point are claimed may be omitted from the report at the discretion of the STM or SM. The monthly SAR and PSHR reports for a station may be combined.

 

7.3.2.1  EXAMPLE MESSAGE - SAR AND PSHR COMBINED

SAR and PSHR combined:

NR 6 W3XYZ 16 SPARKS MD SEP 1

 

Section Traffic Manager (STM)

 

address (Locally usually only the STM’s call sign is required.) =

 

AUGUST

TRAFFIC

3/5/6/2

TOTAL

16

 

PSHR

1/40

2/40

3/10

4/40

 

5/15

6/10

TOTAL

155

X

 

73

 

 

 

 

 

= W3XYZ

The use of  “X  73” is optional. This is an example only. Internal Section Activity Reports may well be tailored by the Section leadership.

 

7.3.2.2  EXAMPLE MESSAGE - PSHR ONLY

PSHR only.

NR 6 W3XYZ 12 SPARKS MD SEP 1

 

Section Traffic Manager (STM)

 

address (Locally usually only the STM’s call sign is required.) =

 

AUGUST

PSHR 

1/40

2/40

3/10

 

4/40

5/15

6/10

TOTAL

155

 

X

73

 

 

 

 

= W3XYZ

The use of  “X 73” is optional. This is an example only.

 

7.3.2.3  EXAMPLE MESSAGE - SAR/PSHR, AUTOMATED TEXT

Text formatted (single spaced) for automated text data processing option (MDC Section):

NR 6 W3XYZ 18 SPARKS MD SEP 1

 

Section Traffic Manager (STM)

 

address (Locally usually only the STM’s call sign is required.) =

 

W3XYZ

0208

SAR

3/5/6/2/16

X

 

W3XYZ

0208

PSHR

1/40

2/40

 

3/10

4/40

5/15

6/10

TOTAL

 

155

X

73

 

 

 

= W3XYZ

The “0208” groups are Year/Month (YYMM), August 2002 in this example. The use of  “X 73” is optional. This is an example only.

 


7.3.3  ARRL PSHR REFERENCE, EFFECTIVE MAY 1, 2002

-----Extract from ARRL:  http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/pshr/

 

A New Season for Public Service Honor Roll

 

Starting May 1, 2002, a new season for the Public Service Honor Roll (PSHR) begins! It has been eleven years since the qualification criteria were last revised. The idea behind updating the PSHR program was initiated largely by the comments and opinions of Amateur Radio operators who are active in all areas of public service communications.

 

Under the guidance of the ARRL Volunteer Resources Committee, a study was conducted and a survey was taken. (See March, 2001, QST's Public Service Column, p. 96). Many ideas and suggestions that covered everything from generalities to specifics about the program were received and incorporated into the thought and discussion process.

 

An ongoing challenge with PSHR is how to effectively balance the many different facets of Amateur Radio public service communications. It seemed that areas such as traffic handling, net operations, on-the-scene emergency response, public safety and support communications all needed to be covered. Leadership and management roles within Amateur Radio public service communications and the ARRL Field Organization also needed recognition. The assignment of point values was a delicate task, too. The resulting criterion attempts to present a balanced program without being too complicated.

 

What does it all mean?

 

1) Participation in a public service net -- 1 point, maximum 40.

 

A public service net is one that is regularly scheduled and handles Amateur Radio formal messages. Here are examples of public service nets: Local and section nets that are affiliated with the National Traffic System (NTS); NTS region, NTS area, and independent nets that handle traffic; ARES, RACES, SKYWARN nets that meet on a regular basis; net sessions that are activated during emergencies and threats of potential emergencies; public service and safety nets; nets that are established for training radio amateurs in public service and emergency communications.

 

 

2) Handling formal messages (radiograms) via any mode -- 1 point for each message handled; maximum 40.

 

A "handled" message is defined as a message that is originated or sent or received or delivered. PSHR will follow the same method as Brass Pounders' League to count an individual operator's traffic total (also known as station activity report) to reach the figure for the new PSHR Category 2. There is one point granted for each message handled; maximum 40 points per calendar month.

 

Here is a reference from the Public Service Communications Manual on how to count messages. [Section 2, NTS Chapter 10.2]
http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/pscm/sec2-ch10.html#2

 

 

Originated--One point for each message from a third party for sending via your station. This "extra" credit is given for an off-the-air function because of the value of contact with the general public.

 

 

Sent--Every message sent over the air from your station to another amateur receives a point in this category. Thus, a message that is eligible for an Originated point as above receives another point when it is sent on the air.

 

Likewise, a message that is received on the air conveys a Sent point when it is relayed to another station. A message that you initiate yourself, while it gets no Originated point, gets a Sent point when cleared. All Sent points require on-the-air sending.

 

 

Received--A message received over the air gets a Received point, whether received for relaying (sending) or for delivery to the addressee. Any message received which is not eligible for a Delivery point (such as one addressed to yourself) is nevertheless eligible for a Received point.

 

 

Delivered--The act of delivery of a message to a third party receives a point in this category, in addition to a Received point. This is strictly an off-the-air function and must be coupled with receipt of the message at your station. Thus you can't get a Delivered point unless you first get a Received point.

 

Further example for clarification: If I send a message originated on behalf of myself, I know I get only one point for a message SENT. However, if I originate a message on behalf of a third party, and then send it, I get TWO points, (origination and sending), even though ONE message was handled.

 

 

3) Serving in an ARRL-sponsored volunteer position: ARRL Field Organization appointee or Section Manager, NTS Net Manager, TCC Director, TCC member, NTS official or appointee above the Section level. -- 10 points for each position; maximum 30.

 

ARRL Field Organization appointees (in alphabetical order) include the following: Assistant Section Managers, District Emergency Coordinators, Emergency Coordinators, Local Government Liaisons, Net Managers, Official Bulletin Stations, Official Emergency Stations, Official Observers, Official Observer Coordinators, Official Relay Stations, Public Information Coordinators, Public Information Officers, Section Emergency Coordinators, Section Managers, Section Traffic Managers, State Government Liaisons, Technical Specialists.

 

The Section Manager is the ARRL-member elected League official the section. NTS Net Managers would include the following nets: NTS Region and NTS Area. TCC (Transcontinental Corps) Director is in charge of organizing his/her TCC membership roster of operators that comprise the corps. TCC members are those operators that are assigned to relay traffic from one NTS area to another, conducting liaison with NTS nets to do so. NTS official or appointee above the Section level includes NTS Area Staff Chairs, NTS Area Digital Coordinators and NTS Digital Stations.

 

More information about the structure of the NTS and the positions and nets that are mentioned in this article may be found in the ARRL's Public Service Communications Manual. It is on the ARRLWeb.

 

 

4) Participation in scheduled, short-term public service events such as walk-a-thons, bike-a-thons, parades, simulated emergency tests and related practice events. This includes off-the-air meetings and coordination efforts with related emergency groups and served agencies.

 

-- 5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent in either coordinating and/or operating in the public service event; no limit.

 

This category recognizes the value of public safety communication events that Amateur Radio is often called to participate in. Simulated emergency tests, exercises, and drills are covered by this category. Points are gained by the amount of time that an Amateur Radio operator spends directly involved in operating the event. This also recognizes the value of off-the-air time it takes to meet with the organization or public service agency to plan and coordinate Amateur Radio involvement.

 

 

5) Participation in an unplanned emergency response when the Amateur Radio operator is on the scene. This also includes unplanned incident requests by public or served agencies for Amateur Radio participation.

 

--5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent directly involved in the emergency operation; no limit.

 

This category recognizes an Amateur Radio operator who is directly involved in an actual emergency operation. This includes the operator who is on the scene or out in the field, in the shelter, at the emergency operations center, at the hospital, or other served agency's headquarters or their temporary command center.

 

The second sentence of Category 5 invites the Amateur Radio operator who is an active participant in an unplanned incident -- or in other words, an emergency operation-- to take credit for his/her participation even though he/she is not physically at the emergency scene.

 

The intent behind Category 5 is to also include the Amateur Radio operators -- like net controllers, net operation and other radio amateurs that support communications in unplanned incidents-- that are not actually on the emergency scene or at the shelter, etc, but are spending time and efforts for supporting the same emergency communication efforts.

 

As an example, if the National Weather Service activates SKYWARN, Amateur Radio operators serve as weather spotters from their home (or car, or work, or other locations) during the weather event. Then, a tornado strikes and the Red Cross calls out the ARES members to serve in shelters and to provide support for damage assessment communications. These operators would be among those to qualify for points under Category 5.

 

There would likely be several net control operators, net liaison operators, traffic handlers, etc, who are away from the disaster scene, but are spending time to support the Amateur Radio emergency communication effort on behalf of the served agencies (Red Cross and National Weather Service, in this example). They, too, would qualify for points under Category 5.

 

 

6.) Providing and maintaining a) an automated digital system that handles ARRL radiogram-formatted messages; b) a Web page e-mail list server oriented toward Amateur Radio public service -- 10 points per item.

 

The portion, "a," is a carry-over from the previous PSHR criteria as this sub category recognizes the efforts it takes to provide and maintain an automated digital system (like a packet bulletin board or a PACTOR system) that handles ARRL radiogram-formatted messages.

 

The portion "b," is a new item. Since the last time PSHR criteria were revised, newer technologies like Web pages and e-mail list servers have become popular and effective ways to communicate news and information to the community of radio amateurs that are involved in emergency and public service communication operations and preparedness.

 

 

Starting May 1, 2002

 

The new PSHR qualification criteria goes into effect on May 1, 2002. Therefore, the August, 2002, QST will be the first month to report the results under the new criteria. If an Amateur Radio operator is presently in the middle of his/her quest for qualifying for the PSHR certificate under the old criteria, those months will continue to count toward the certificate.

 

If you qualify for PSHR during a given month, send your results to either your Section Traffic Manager or Section Manager. These leaders, in turn, will forward the PSHR qualifiers to ARRL Headquarters for notation in the monthly PSHR listing in QST. Further questions about the program may be sent to Steve Ewald, WV1X, at ARRL Headquarters (sewald@arrl.org).

 


Public Service Honor Roll Criteria

 

Effective May 1, 2002

 

This listing is to recognize radio amateurs whose public service performance during the month indicted qualifies for 70 or more total points in the following 6 categories (as reported to their Section Managers). Please note the maximum points for each category:

 

1.) Participating in a public service net, using any mode. --1 point per net session; maximum 40.

 

2.) Handling formal messages (radiograms) via any mode. --1 point for each message handled; maximum 40.

 

3.) Serving in an ARRL-sponsored volunteer position: ARRL Field Organization appointee or Section Manager, NTS Net Manager, TCC Director, TCC member, NTS official or appointee above the Section level. -- 10 points for each position; maximum 30.

 

4.) Participation in scheduled, short-term public service events such as walk-a-thons, bike-a-thons, parades, simulated emergency tests and related practice events. This includes off-the-air meetings and coordination efforts with related emergency groups and served agencies.-- 5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent in either coordinating and/or operating in the public service event; no limit.

 

5.) Participation in an unplanned emergency response when the Amateur Radio operator is on the scene. This also includes unplanned incident requests by public or served agencies for Amateur Radio participation. -- 5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent directly involved in the emergency operation; no limit.

 

6.) Providing and maintaining a) an automated digital system that handles ARRL radiogram-formatted messages; b) a Web page e-mail list server oriented toward Amateur Radio public service -- 10 points per item.

 

Amateur Radio stations that qualify for PSHR 12 consecutive months, or 18 out of a 24 month period, will be awarded a certificate from Headquarters upon written notification of qualifying months to the Public Service Branch of Field and Educational Services at ARRL HQ.

 

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Page last modified: 08:19 AM, 26 Feb 2002 ET
Page author: sewald@arrl.org
Copyright © 2002, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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